December 14, 1928: Sewage treatment plant at Boonton; 1853: Founding of Compagnie Générale des Eaux

Boonton Dam and Spillway

Boonton Dam and Spillway

December 14, 1928: Start of operation of sewage treatment plant at Boonton Reservoir. “In 1925, a trunk sewer intercepting the wastes from Dover, Boonton and smaller habitations in New Jersey on the Rockaway River was completed. Continuing to confound and delay water and sewer development in the watershed, the Morris Canal figured into the final plan for sewers. The alignment for the intercepting sewer included part of the right-of-way for the Morris Canal and the canal had to be abandoned before the sewer could be completed. At about the same time, a sewage treatment plant at Boonton was finished. The plant employed the trickling filter method of sewage treatment followed by sand filtration and chlorination of the plant’s effluent. Because of a number of delays, the sewage treatment plant was not put into operation until December 14, 1928.”

Reference: McGuire, Michael J. 2013. The Chlorine Revolution: Water Disinfection and the Fight to Save Lives. Denver, CO:American Water Works Association, Chapter 11.

Imperial Decree from Napoleon III Establishing Compagnie Generale des Eaux

Imperial Decree from Napoleon III Establishing Compagnie Generale des Eaux

December 14, 1853: Founding of Compagnie Générale des Eaux (now Veolia). “Compagnie Générale des Eaux is founded and obtains its first public service concession to supply water to the city of Lyons. On the initiative of Napoleon III and throughout the entire Second Empire, the creation of private companies to operate the urban water systems opens the way for modernization and enhances the quality of life in towns and cities. Count Henri Siméon embodies this dynamism when he founds the Compagnie Générale des Eaux in 1853: ‘In the new times ahead, be certain, sirs, that millions will be allotted to the supply of water, just as millions were allocated to railways previously.’

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