August 3, 1918: Improve Pumping Station Grounds

0803 Improve Pumping Station GroundsAugust 3, 1918: Municipal Journal article. Improving Pumping Station Grounds. “The average waterworks superintendent believes that a properly-maintained water system is the greatest asset a municipality can own; but it must be conceded that neglected pumping station grounds are about the worst sort of adverse advertising for a community. However, the superintendent who starts out to improve and beautify the grounds around the pumping station will meet with many discouraging conditions, because the average councilman will be satisfied as long as the plant is furnishing an adequate supply of water, and is opposed to spending money in order to beautify the location.

Like many of the pumping station grounds in the west, that of Lewiston, Idaho, is located on a gravel bank beside the river and therefore required considerable expenditure before the grounds were fit to produce vegetation. The location, however, was ideal for a beauty spot, although it was nothing more than a gravel bank, as it afforded the possibilities of providing an exceptionally fine resting place. The grounds are midway between the residential section of the city and its largest and most frequented park, on the south bank of the Clearwater river, which bends gracefully into the city in such a manner as to afford an excellent view of it from the grounds. They also overlook the great fruit farms between the river and the hills to the north. Because of these advantages they are used as a resting place and view point by many citizens.”

Commentary: A good example of form over substance in 1918. People were still dying from typhoid fever and diarrheal diseases.

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