August 6, 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act

President Clinton signing the 1996 amendments

President Clinton signing the 1996 amendments

August 6, 1996: The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act became law. “In 1996, Congress amended the Safe Drinking Water Act to emphasize sound science and risk-based standard setting, small water supply system flexibility and technical assistance, community-empowered source water assessment and protection, public right-to-know, and water system infrastructure assistance through a multi-billion-dollar state revolving loan fund. The amendments were signed into law by President Bill Clinton on August 6, 1996.

Main points of the 1996 amendments

  • Consumer Confidence Reports: All community water systems must prepare and distribute annual reports about the water they provide, including information on detected contaminants, possible health effects, and the water’s source.
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis: EPA must conduct a thorough cost-benefit analysis for every new standard to determine whether the benefits of a drinking water standard justify the costs.
  • Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.[24] States can use this fund to help water systems make infrastructure or management improvements or to help systems assess and protect their source water.
  • Microbial Contaminants and Disinfection Byproducts: EPA is required to strengthen protection for microbial contaminants, including cryptosporidium, while strengthening control over the byproducts of chemical disinfection. EPA promulgated the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule[25] and the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule[26] to address these risks.
  • Operator Certification: Water system operators must be certified to ensure that systems are operated safely. EPA issued guidelines in 1999 specifying minimum standards for the certification and recertification of the operators of community and non-transient, noncommunity water systems.[27] These guidelines apply to state operator certification programs. All states are currently implementing EPA-approved operator certification programs.
  • Public Information and Consultation: SDWA emphasizes that consumers have a right to know what is in their drinking water, where it comes from, how it is treated, and how to help protect it. EPA distributes public information materials (through its Drinking Water Hotline, Safewater web site, and Resource Center) and holds public meetings, working with states, tribes, water systems, and environmental and civic groups, to encourage public involvement.
  • Small Water Systems: Small water systems are given special consideration and resources under SDWA, to make sure they have the managerial, financial, and technical ability to comply with drinking water standards.”

Commentary: These amendments established the essential law that water utilities must currently adhere to through compliance with the regulations promulgated under it.

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4 thoughts on “August 6, 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act

  1. Pingback: August 6, 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act — This Day in Water History | Sustainable WasteWater News & Education

  2. Pingback: August 6, 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act — This Day in Water History | Collaborative Water Solutions WasteWater Education

  3. Pingback: August 6, 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act — This Day in Water History | EDUCACIÓN ACERCA DE LA SUSTENTABILIDAD DEL AGUA PARA INDIVIDUOS Y PEQUEÑAS COMUNIDADES

  4. Pingback: August 6, 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act — This Day in Water History | Mary, Mary, how does your drainfield grow?

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