Tag Archives: American Water Works Association

June 13, 1912: AWWA Grows

June 13, 1912:  Municipal Journaleditorial. The American Water Works Association. “This association has experienced a growth during the past few years which is extremely gratifying to the old members and officers, and this year, its thirty-second, finds it with only a few short of one thousand. Ten years ago the membership was 329; two years later it had increased by 130, and the growth in numbers continued until in 1910 it had reached 946. In that year more than 100 were lost by a more stringent enforcement of the rule requiring dropping for continued non-payment of dues and by resignations, and the same was true to a less extent last year; but the addition of more than 200 new members during these two years has resulted in a net increase to 975.

More commendable than growth in numbers has been the higher standing which the society has taken as an organization of professional technical men. Last week several hundred of such men attended the convention, and during the four days of this, eight sessions were devoted to discussing water works matters; two trips were taken to pumping and water purification plants, and only one was for pleasure alone. This indicates a seriousness of purpose comparing well with that to be found at the conventions of any of the national technical societies. Even more significant of the spirit of the members is the fact that fully one-half of the time of the business meetings was devoted to general discussions in which a large percentage of those present took part.”

Commentary:  AWWA had a long way to go to achieve the professional reputation it experiences today. In the early days, it was little more than a social club. Yes, it was composed entirely of men back then. They did not know what they were missing by ignoring the expertise and enthusiasm of half of the population.

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March 29, 1881: AWWA Founded

March 29, 1881:  AWWA founded. “On March 29, 1881, in Engineers’ Hall on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., 22 men representing water utilities in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee founded the American Water Works Association.

They adopted a constitution that stated the purpose of the association as being “for the exchange of information pertaining to the management of water-works, for the mutual advancement of consumers and water companies, and for the purpose of securing economy and uniformity in the operations of water-works.”

On Jan. 1, 1976, AWWA filed Articles of Incorporation in Illinois that reframed AWWA’s purpose as follows:

‘The purpose for which the Association is formed is to promote public health, safety, and welfare through the improvement of the quality and quantity of water delivered to the public and the development and furtherance of understanding of the problems relating thereto by:

  • Advancing the knowledge of the design, construction, operation, water treatment and management of water utilities and developing standards for procedures, equipment and materials used by public water supply systems;
  • Advancing the knowledge of the problems involved in the development of resources, production and distribution of safe and adequate water supplies;
  • Educating the public on the problems of water supply and promoting a spirit of cooperation between consumers and suppliers in solving these problems; and
  • Conducting research to determine the causes of problems of providing a safe and adequate water supply and proposing solutions thereto in an effort to improve the quality and quantity of the water supply provided to the public.’

The history of AWWA is the history of the people who have committed themselves to achieving the purpose set forth more than a century ago, now simply stated as to be The Authoritative Resource on Safe Water.”

June 13, 1912: AWWA Grows

June 13, 1912: Municipal Journal editorial. The American Water Works Association. “This association has experienced a growth during the past few years which is extremely gratifying to the old members and officers, and this year, its thirty-second, finds it with only a few short of one thousand. Ten years ago the membership was 329; two years later it had increased by 130, and the growth in numbers continued until in 1910 it had reached 946. In that year more than 100 were lost by a more stringent enforcement of the rule requiring dropping for continued non-payment of dues and by resignations, and the same was true to a less extent last year; but the addition of more than 200 new members during these two years has resulted in a net increase to 975.

More commendable than growth in numbers has been the higher standing which the society has taken as an organization of professional technical men. Last week several hundred of such men attended the convention, and during the four days of this, eight sessions were devoted to discussing water works matters; two trips were taken to pumping and water purification plants, and only one was for pleasure alone. This indicates a seriousness of purpose comparing well with that to be found at the conventions of any of the national technical societies. Even more significant of the spirit of the members is the fact that fully one-half of the time of the business meetings was devoted to general discussions in which a large percentage of those present took part.”

Commentary: AWWA had a long way to go to achieve the professional reputation it experiences today. In the early days, it was little more than a social club. Yes, it was composed entirely of men back then. They did not know what they were missing by ignoring the expertise and enthusiasm of half of the population.

March 29, 1881: AWWA Founded

March 29, 1881: AWWA founded. “On March 29, 1881, in Engineers’ Hall on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., 22 men representing water utilities in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee founded the American Water Works Association.

They adopted a constitution that stated the purpose of the association as being “for the exchange of information pertaining to the management of water-works, for the mutual advancement of consumers and water companies, and for the purpose of securing economy and uniformity in the operations of water-works.”

On Jan. 1, 1976, AWWA filed Articles of Incorporation in Illinois that reframed AWWA’s purpose as follows:

‘The purpose for which the Association is formed is to promote public health, safety, and welfare through the improvement of the quality and quantity of water delivered to the public and the development and furtherance of understanding of the problems relating thereto by:

  • Advancing the knowledge of the design, construction, operation, water treatment and management of water utilities and developing standards for procedures, equipment and materials used by public water supply systems;
  • Advancing the knowledge of the problems involved in the development of resources, production and distribution of safe and adequate water supplies;
  • Educating the public on the problems of water supply and promoting a spirit of cooperation between consumers and suppliers in solving these problems; and
  • Conducting research to determine the causes of problems of providing a safe and adequate water supply and proposing solutions thereto in an effort to improve the quality and quantity of the water supply provided to the public.’

The history of AWWA is the history of the people who have committed themselves to achieving the purpose set forth more than a century ago, now simply stated as to be The Authoritative Resource on Safe Water.”

June 13, 1912: AWWA Grows

0613 AWWAJune 13, 1912: Municipal Journal editorial. The American Water Works Association. “This association has experienced a growth during the past few years which is extremely gratifying to the old members and officers, and this year, its thirty-second, finds it with only a few short of one thousand. Ten years ago the membership was 329; two years later it had increased by 130, and the growth in numbers continued until in 1910 it had reached 946. In that year more than 100 were lost by a more stringent enforcement of the rule requiring dropping for continued non-payment of dues and by resignations, and the same was true to a less extent last year; but the addition of more than 200 new members during these two years has resulted in a net increase to 975.

More commendable than growth in numbers has been the higher standing which the society has taken as an organization of professional technical men. Last week several hundred of such men attended the convention, and during the four days of this, eight sessions were devoted to discussing water works matters; two trips were taken to pumping and water purification plants, and only one was for pleasure alone. This indicates a seriousness of purpose comparing well with that to be found at the conventions of any of the national technical societies. Even more significant of the spirit of the members is the fact that fully one-half of the time of the business meetings was devoted to general discussions in which a large percentage of those present took part.”

Commentary: AWWA had a long way to go to achieve the professional reputation it experiences today. In the early days, it was little more than a social club. Yes, it was composed entirely of men back then. They did not know what they were missing by ignoring the expertise and enthusiasm of half of the population.

March 29, 1881: AWWA Founded

0329 AWWA foundedMarch 29, 1881: AWWA founded. “On March 29, 1881, in Engineers’ Hall on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., 22 men representing water utilities in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, and Tennessee founded the American Water Works Association.

They adopted a constitution that stated the purpose of the association as being “for the exchange of information pertaining to the management of water-works, for the mutual advancement of consumers and water companies, and for the purpose of securing economy and uniformity in the operations of water-works.”

On Jan. 1, 1976, AWWA filed Articles of Incorporation in Illinois that reframed AWWA’s purpose as follows:

‘The purpose for which the Association is formed is to promote public health, safety, and welfare through the improvement of the quality and quantity of water delivered to the public and the development and furtherance of understanding of the problems relating thereto by:

  • Advancing the knowledge of the design, construction, operation, water treatment and management of water utilities and developing standards for procedures, equipment and materials used by public water supply systems;
  • Advancing the knowledge of the problems involved in the development of resources, production and distribution of safe and adequate water supplies;
  • Educating the public on the problems of water supply and promoting a spirit of cooperation between consumers and suppliers in solving these problems; and
  • Conducting research to determine the causes of problems of providing a safe and adequate water supply and proposing solutions thereto in an effort to improve the quality and quantity of the water supply provided to the public.’

The history of AWWA is the history of the people who have committed themselves to achieving the purpose set forth more than a century ago, now simply stated as to be The Authoritative Resource on Safe Water.”

 

June 13, 1912: AWWA Grows

0613 AWWAJune 13, 1912: Municipal Journal editorial. The American Water Works Association. “This association has experienced a growth during the past few years which is extremely gratifying to the old members and officers, and this year, its thirty-second, finds it with only a few short of one thousand. Ten years ago the membership was 329; two years later it had increased by 130, and the growth in numbers continued until in 1910 it had reached 946. In that year more than 100 were lost by a more stringent enforcement of the rule requiring dropping for continued non-payment of dues and by resignations, and the same was true to a less extent last year; but the addition of more than 200 new members during these two years has resulted in a net increase to 975.

More commendable than growth in numbers has been the higher standing which the society has taken as an organization of professional technical men. Last week several hundred of such men attended the convention, and during the four days of this, eight sessions were devoted to discussing water works matters; two trips were taken to pumping and water purification plants, and only one was for pleasure alone. This indicates a seriousness of purpose comparing well with that to be found at the conventions of any of the national technical societies. Even more significant of the spirit of the members is the fact that fully one-half of the time of the business meetings was devoted to general discussions in which a large percentage of those present took part.”

Commentary: AWWA had a long way to go to achieve the professional reputation it experiences today. In the early days, it was little more than a social club. Yes, it was composed entirely of men back then. They did not know what they were missing by ignoring the expertise and enthusiasm of half of the population.