Tag Archives: bottled water

#TDIWH—February 10, 1990: Perrier Water Recalled

0210 PerrierFebruary 10, 1990: New York Times headline— Perrier Recalls Its Water in U.S. After Benzene Is Found in Bottles. by George James “The company that made bottled mineral water chic is voluntarily recalling its entire inventory of Perrier from store shelves throughout the United States after tests showed the presence of the chemical benzene in a small sample of bottles.

The impurity was discovered in North Carolina by county officials who so prized the purity of Perrier that they used it as a standard in tests of other water supplies.

The Food and Drug Administration said it is testing supplies in California and other states. In a written statement issued last night, Ronald V. Davis, president of the Perrier Group of America Inc., said there was no significant health risk to the public. But the statement did not go into the details of the recall, how it would work, the number of bottles to be recalled and the impact on a company that has built its success on its product’s image of purity and stylishness.

William M. Grigg, a spokesman for the Food and Drug Administration, said his agency’s Hazard Evaluation Board had collected samples of Perrier and found no immediate risk to the public from the benzene in the water.”

November 11, 1990: Underground Tanks in New York; 1991: Bottled Water Use in NYC

1111 LeakingTankNovember 11, 1990New York Times headline–State Is Taking Action On Underground Tanks. “Through one of the strictest programs of its type in the country, the State Department of Environmental Protection has forced the replacement of 12,000 underground gasoline tanks that were leaking or were so old that they were in danger of leaking. Now the state is going after the 350 to 400 old tanks it estimates are still in use, including some of its own.

‘In the last three years, more tanks have been replaced at gasoline stations in Connecticut than in the previous 30,’ said Charles S. Isenberg, executive vice president of the Independent Connecticut Petroleum Association.

Unearthing the tanks has shown that more were leaking than the state anticipated — as many as 80 percent, compared with the expected one-third — said G. Scott Deshefy of the environmental agency’s underground-tank program.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s coordinator for Connecticut, Jonathan M. Walker, said the program has become a model for other states. Even in cases where the tanks are in good shape, he said, the inspections are revealing leaks from pipes.”

Scare tactics have been employed by unscrupulous individuals trying to sell bottled water.

Scare tactics have been employed by unscrupulous individuals trying to sell bottled water.

November 11, 1991New York Times headline–It’s Wet, Free and Gets No Respect. “In the tea department of Fortnum & Mason, which has guided the palates of England for 300 years, a few rules must never be broken: drink only premium blends; keep air out of the canister, and brew your beverage with the finest water available — New York City’s if possible.

It may surprise the people who live in the city, having turned to bottled water in numbers that mystify even those who are paid to sell it, but New York’s tap water remains as good as it gets. Just ask an expert.

‘Naturally, there are many fine reasons to visit New York,’ said Eugene Hayes, director of the tea department at Fortnum & Mason in London, which among its dozens of specialty offerings carries a dark Ceylon brand called New York Blend. ‘But I would have to say one of the best is the water.’

For generations, New Yorkers rejoiced in the high quality of their drinking water, which runs swiftly and practically untouched to their faucets from the peaks of the Catskills 100 miles away. But that trust has disappeared during the last 10 years, eroded by an epidemic of nervousness that has left many people convinced that water with a label has to be better than water from a pipe.”

Commentary My how times have changed. Bottled water is given failing marks these days because of the cost and impact on the environment. Good old tap water gets high marks.

September 18, 1985: Mineral Water from Georgia; 1981: Valley of the Drums

0918 Lithia Springs waterSeptember 18, 1985New York Times headline–Mineral Water From Georgia Being Bottled. Mineral-rich water from a spring that was once known for its supposed curative powers is being bottled for sale again for the first time in almost 50 years.

Water flowing beneath the 750 million-year-old granite formation underlying much of metropolitan Atlanta picks up minute amounts of salt, potassium, magnesium and lithium, a rare light metal that gave Lithia Springs its name and its reputation. Lithium, a potentially dangerous substance in large doses, is used in the treatment of manic depression.

In the late 1800′s and early 1900′s, tourists and invalids flocked to Lithia Springs, a small city 20 miles west of Atlanta, to drink and bathe in the mineral water. A Congress of Physicians was held there in 1887, which recommended the salty-tasting water for dozens of ailments including kidney stones, typhoid fever, eczema, nervous prostration, and ”diseases of delicate women.” [Typhoid fever?  Really?]

0918 Valley of the DrumsSeptember 18, 1981USEPA Press Release–”An expenditure of $400,000 will be made from the new Superfund for emergency cleanup work at Kentucky’s top priority hazardous waste site–the Valley of the Drums, near Louisville. Anne M. Gorsuch, Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said today EPA will spend the money to pay for removal of about 1,500 drums containing chemical waste to reduce the possibility of fire.

The Valley of the Drums drew national attention in 1979 as one of the country’s worst abandoned hazardous waste sites. Thousands of drums–accumulated over a 10-year period–were strewn in pits and trenches over a 23-acre site in Bullitt County. The drums of the site scheduled for cleanup are deteriorating quickly. When it rains, they overflow and leak into Wilson Creek, a tributary of the Ohio River. They contain such chemicals as benzene, toluene and methylmethacrylate.”

September 4, 2006: Bottled Water Use in Iraq War

0904 Bottled Water in IraqSeptember 4, 2006Production of Bottled Drinking Water by Oasis. “MNC-I Theater-Specific Requirements for Sanitary Control and Surveillance of Field Water Supplies (MNC-I Operations Order 06-02, September 4, 2006) states that only bottled water is authorized for drinking in Iraq. TB MED 577 requires Veterinary Services or Preventive Medicine to inspect and provide monthly monitoring of the bottling facilities and water quality to ensure that the bottled water is safe. Oasis operates six bottled-water facilities to produce drinking water for U.S. forces throughout Iraq. We visited the facility at Camp Liberty on the Victory Base Complex in Baghdad. We observed its operations and reviewed the preventive medicine oversight records for December 27, 2005, through December 2, 2006. The Oasis bottled water production facility at Camp Liberty operated in accordance with the applicable quality control and oversight procedures.”

FORWARD OPERATING BASE WARRIOR, KIRKUK, Iraq– “It takes 864,000 bottles of water a month to keep Soldiers on Forward Operating Base Warrior, Kirkuk, Iraq, hydrated, and during the peak summer season that number nearly doubles.

This staggering amount of water is delivered around the FOB by a single platoon of Soldiers from Company A, 15th Brigade Support Battalion, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. According to Sgt. 1st Class Baulino Moralez, a Edinburg, Texas, native and the fuel and water platoon sergeant in Co. A, the water supports nearly 5,000 Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and civilians on the installation, and also goes to bases in the surrounding area. Moralez also said in Iraq, it is often unsafe for non-nationals who do not have proper immunities to drink from local water sources, making bottled water essential. “The bottled water [we deliver] is guaranteed to be contamination free,” said Moralez. “Soldiers don’t have to think twice about the quality of the water they are consuming and can focus on performing their mission,” he continued.

With so many units working on Warrior, bottled water must be delivered to several locations around the FOB. “When people call us and say they need water…we come running,” said Moralez. “We make sure water is convenient and accessible for them,” said Spc. Shawn Horton, an Orlando, Fla., native and a petroleum supply specialist with Co. A. This platoon tries to make it as easy as possible for people on the go to be able to find the water they need, he continued. “They need water…to do everyday operations. People need to stay hydrated.” “With the weather as hot as it is, the challenge for this platoon is getting water to everywhere it needs to go before the last drop runs out,” said Moralez.

Unlike some jobs, these Soldiers get to see the positive results of what they do on an everyday basis. “We get a lot of ‘thank yous,'” said Horton. “Even if we don’t get a thank you, we know we are appreciated because the water gets drank.” “It is nice for someone to be there at all times to provide water without people having to go around looking for it,” said Sgt. Vanee Ngirkiklang, a gun truck operator with Co. B, 15th BSB. With the weather not expected to cool down any time soon, the water delivery platoon will have its hands full keeping the residents of this FOB hydrated.”

September 2, 2001: H2NO Coca Cola Campaign

0902 H2NOSeptember 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

November 11, 1990: Underground Tanks in New York; 1991: Bottled Water Use in NYC

1111 LeakingTankNovember 11, 1990New York Times headline–State Is Taking Action On Underground Tanks. “Through one of the strictest programs of its type in the country, the State Department of Environmental Protection has forced the replacement of 12,000 underground gasoline tanks that were leaking or were so old that they were in danger of leaking. Now the state is going after the 350 to 400 old tanks it estimates are still in use, including some of its own.

‘In the last three years, more tanks have been replaced at gasoline stations in Connecticut than in the previous 30,’ said Charles S. Isenberg, executive vice president of the Independent Connecticut Petroleum Association.

Unearthing the tanks has shown that more were leaking than the state anticipated — as many as 80 percent, compared with the expected one-third — said G. Scott Deshefy of the environmental agency’s underground-tank program.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s coordinator for Connecticut, Jonathan M. Walker, said the program has become a model for other states. Even in cases where the tanks are in good shape, he said, the inspections are revealing leaks from pipes.”

Scare tactics have been employed by unscrupulous individuals trying to sell bottled water.

Scare tactics have been employed by unscrupulous individuals trying to sell bottled water.

November 11, 1991New York Times headline–It’s Wet, Free and Gets No Respect. “In the tea department of Fortnum & Mason, which has guided the palates of England for 300 years, a few rules must never be broken: drink only premium blends; keep air out of the canister, and brew your beverage with the finest water available — New York City’s if possible.

It may surprise the people who live in the city, having turned to bottled water in numbers that mystify even those who are paid to sell it, but New York’s tap water remains as good as it gets. Just ask an expert.

‘Naturally, there are many fine reasons to visit New York,’ said Eugene Hayes, director of the tea department at Fortnum & Mason in London, which among its dozens of specialty offerings carries a dark Ceylon brand called New York Blend. ‘But I would have to say one of the best is the water.’

For generations, New Yorkers rejoiced in the high quality of their drinking water, which runs swiftly and practically untouched to their faucets from the peaks of the Catskills 100 miles away. But that trust has disappeared during the last 10 years, eroded by an epidemic of nervousness that has left many people convinced that water with a label has to be better than water from a pipe.”

Commentary My how times have changed. Bottled water is giving failing marks these days because of the cost and impact on the environment. Good old tap water gets high marks.

September 18, 1985: Mineral Water from Georgia; 1981: Valley of the Drums

0918 Lithia Springs waterSeptember 18, 1985New York Times headline–Mineral Water From Georgia Being Bottled. Mineral-rich water from a spring that was once known for its supposed curative powers is being bottled for sale again for the first time in almost 50 years.

Water flowing beneath the 750 million-year-old granite formation underlying much of metropolitan Atlanta picks up minute amounts of salt, potassium, magnesium and lithium, a rare light metal that gave Lithia Springs its name and its reputation. Lithium, a potentially dangerous substance in large doses, is used in the treatment of manic depression.

In the late 1800′s and early 1900′s, tourists and invalids flocked to Lithia Springs, a small city 20 miles west of Atlanta, to drink and bathe in the mineral water. A Congress of Physicians was held there in 1887, which recommended the salty-tasting water for dozens of ailments including kidney stones, typhoid fever, eczema, nervous prostration, and ”diseases of delicate women.” [Typhoid fever?  Really?]

0918 Valley of the DrumsSeptember 18, 1981USEPA Press Release–”An expenditure of $400,000 will be made from the new Superfund for emergency cleanup work at Kentucky’s top priority hazardous waste site–the Valley of the Drums, near Louisville. Anne M. Gorsuch, Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, said today EPA will spend the money to pay for removal of about 1,500 drums containing chemical waste to reduce the possibility of fire.

The Valley of the Drums drew national attention in 1979 as one of the country’s worst abandoned hazardous waste sites. Thousands of drums–accumulated over a 10-year period–were strewn in pits and trenches over a 23-acre site in Bullitt County. The drums of the site scheduled for cleanup are deteriorating quickly. When it rains, they overflow and leak into Wilson Creek, a tributary of the Ohio River. They contain such chemicals as benzene, toluene and methylmethacrylate.”