Tag Archives: Cheesman Dam

August 6, 2018: Denver Water Turns 100; 1996: Amendments to Safe Drinking Water Act

Water quality lab of the Denver Union Water Company in 1896

August 6, 2018:  100-Year Anniversary of Denver Water.“Long before Denver was born, the South Platte River and Cherry Creek were oases for people who traveled the dry Great Plains. These early pioneers could make do without many things. Water was not one of them. That’s why they camped along the banks of Cherry Creek and the South Platte River, drinking water straight from the source.

Eventually, several private water companies started offering water service to the settlers, competing with each other for business before collapsing or merging with other companies. Then, on Aug. 6, 1918, voters decided to buy the Denver Union Water Company and form the municipal agency now known as Denver Water for a sum of $14 million. In 2018 dollars, that’s roughly just shy of $250 million…In doing so, Denver residents voted to create an entity that would operate independently from city government, keeping water service separate from local politics.

Cheesman Dam, completed in 1905, was the tallest dam in the world

That progressive move by early Denverites paved the way for 100 years of stable water service.  The last 100 years hold a storied history of transformational, iconic moments, including construction of the world’s longest underground tunnel, the world’s tallest dam, and even a project kicked off with a blast from President Calvin Coolidge. With the help of these engineering feats, we’ve built a complex, intricate system that delivers safe, clean water to 1.4 million people.”

President Clinton signing the 1996 amendments

August 6, 1996:  The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act became law.“In 1996, Congress amended the Safe Drinking Water Act to emphasize sound science and risk-based standard setting, small water supply system flexibility and technical assistance, community-empowered source water assessment and protection, public right-to-know, and water system infrastructure assistance through a multi-billion-dollar state revolving loan fund. The amendments were signed into law by President Bill Clinton on August 6, 1996.

Main points of the 1996 amendments

  • Consumer Confidence Reports: All community water systems must prepare and distribute annual reports about the water they provide, including information on detected contaminants, possible health effects, and the water’s source.
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis: EPA must conduct a thorough cost-benefit analysis for every new standard to determine whether the benefits of a drinking water standard justify the costs.
  • Drinking Water State Revolving Fund.[24] States can use this fund to help water systems make infrastructure or management improvements or to help systems assess and protect their source water.
  • Microbial Contaminants and Disinfection Byproducts: EPA is required to strengthen protection for microbial contaminants, including cryptosporidium, while strengthening control over the byproducts of chemical disinfection. EPA promulgated the Stage 1 Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule[25] and the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule[26] to address these risks.
  • Operator Certification: Water system operators must be certified to ensure that systems are operated safely. EPA issued guidelines in 1999 specifying minimum standards for the certification and recertification of the operators of community and non-transient, noncommunity water systems.[27] These guidelines apply to state operator certification programs. All states are currently implementing EPA-approved operator certification programs.
  • Public Information and Consultation: SDWA emphasizes that consumers have a right to know what is in their drinking water, where it comes from, how it is treated, and how to help protect it. EPA distributes public information materials (through its Drinking Water Hotline, Safewater web site, and Resource Center) and holds public meetings, working with states, tribes, water systems, and environmental and civic groups, to encourage public involvement.
  • Small Water Systems: Small water systems are given special consideration and resources under SDWA, to make sure they have the managerial, financial, and technical ability to comply with drinking water standards.”

Commentary:  These amendmentsestablished the essential law that water utilities must currently adhere to through compliance with the regulations promulgated under it.

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