Tag Archives: Coca-Cola

September 2, 2001: H2NO Coca Cola Campaign

September 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

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September 2, 2001: H2NO Coca Cola Campaign

September 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

September 2, 2001: H2NO Coca Cola Campaign

0902 H2NOSeptember 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

September 2, 2001: H2NO Coca Cola Campaign

0902 H2NOSeptember 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

September 2, 2001: H2NO Coca Cola Campaign

0902 H2NOSeptember 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

September 2

0902 H2NOBy Michael J. McGuire

September 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.

September 2

September 2, 2001:  An article published in the New York Times on this date reported on the H2NO campaign by Coca-Cola.  H2NO refers to a effort by Coca-Cola to dissuade consumers from ordering tap water drinks at restaurants, and to instead order more profitable soft drinks, non-carbonated beverages, or bottled water. The campaign’s title, H2NO, reflects the program’s purpose, which is to have customers say No to H2O, the chemical formula for water. The program taught waiters how to use “suggestive selling techniques” to offer an onslaught of alternative beverages when diners asked for water.