Tag Archives: evaporation

November 14, 1765: Death of Robert Fulton; 1840: Birth of Claude Monet; 1919: Death of John Aitken

November 14, 1765Today in Science History. Robert Fulton–Born 14 Nov 1765; died 24 Feb 1815 at age 49. “American inventor, engineer, and artist who brought steamboating from the experimental stage to commercial success. He did not invent the steamboat, which had been built in the early 1700’s, but rather applied his engineering skills to their design. He changed the proportions, arrangements, and velocities of already proposed ideas. In 1807, work was completed on the Clermont, the first steamboat that was truly successful, and the culmination of many years of work. It’s maiden voyage was on 17 Aug from New York City to Albany, a distance of 150 miles completed in 32 hours. A mechanical genius with many talents, he also designed a system of inland waterways, a submarine (Nautilus, 1801), and a steam warship.”

November 14, 1840:  “Claude Monet (14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) is born. He was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting…. Monet was fond of painting controlled nature: his own gardens in Giverny, with its water lilies, pond, and bridge. He also painted up and down the banks of the Seine, producing paintings such as Break-up of the ice on the Seine.” Perhaps Monet’s most famous series of paintings is his Water Lilies.

Dust Storm in Phoenix, AZ, July 25, 2014

November 14, 1919Today in Science History. John Aitken died. (born 18 Sep 1839)  “Scottish physicist and meteorologist known for his research work on atmospheric dust, the formation of dew, cyclones and evaporation. He invented the koniscope to detect and study atmospheric dust particles. He determined that condensation of atmospheric water vapor from clouds and fogs begins on the surface of microscopic particles (now known as Aitken nuclei) as a crucial step in the formation of rain and dew. Combustion produces a profusion of such particles. Suffering from ill health, he worked from a laboratory in his Falkirk home.”

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May 8, 2015: Croton Water Filtration Plant Activated; 1961: First Practical Seawater Desalination Plant

May 8, 2015: Croton Water Filtration Plant Activated. “Largest Underground Filtration Plant in the United States has the Capacity to Filter up to 290 Million Gallons of Drinking Water Each Day;  Will Protect the City against the Possibility of Drought and the Effects of Climate Change

Photos of the Project and Maps are available on DEP’s Flickr Page

New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Emily Lloyd today announced that the $3.2 billion Croton Filtration Plant was recently activated and water from the Croton water supply system has been reintroduced into the city’s distribution network for the first time since 2008.  Built beneath Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx, preparatory site work and excavation for the 400,000 square foot facility began in 2004.  Construction commenced in 2007 and, at the height of the work, roughly 1,300 laborers were on-site.  In addition to building the plant, the 33-mile long New Croton Aqueduct was rehabilitated and three new water tunnels were constructed to bring water to the plant, and then from the plant back to the distribution system.  With the capacity to filter up to 290 million gallons of water a day, the state of the art facility can provide roughly 30 percent of the city’s current daily water needs.

‘The activation of the Croton Filtration Plant marks a significant moment in the history of New York City,” said DEP Commissioner Lloyd.  “The Filtration Plant will help to ensure the city has a safe and reliable supply of drinking water in the event of a future drought, provide critical flexibility as we deal with the effects of a changing climate and allow us to make needed repairs to other parts of the water supply system.  All New Yorkers should raise a glass of New York City tap water today and recognize the thousands of workers who have contributed to the completion of this critical facility.’”

Commentary: The Croton water supply was first inaugurated in 1842 as an unfiltered water supply. Check out the October 14 post in this blog for some details. Shooting off 100 cannon is a great way to celebrate a new water supply. Follow this link to a brochure describing the project that is located below ground. The photo above shows the golf course and park that are built on top of the plant.

Seawater Desalination Plant (Evaporation Method), Freeport, Texas

May 8, 1961: Office of Saline Water, U.S. Dept. of the Interior opened first practical seawater conversion plant in U.S. in Freeport, TX; designed to produce about million gallons of water a day at cost of about $1.25 per thousand gallons; the large-scale evaporation method used then replaced by reverse osmosis as scientific advances have produced special polymers suitable for use as filtering membranes.

Commentary:  Looks pretty clunky compared to today’s technology.

Reference: “Business History.” Website http://www.businesshistory.com/index.php, Accessed November 14, 2012.

November 14, 1765: Death of Robert Fulton; 1840: Birth of Claude Monet; 1919: Death of John Aitken

1114 Robert FultonNovember 14, 1765: Today in Science History. Robert Fulton–Born 14 Nov 1765; died 24 Feb 1815 at age 49. “American inventor, engineer, and artist who brought steamboating from the experimental stage to commercial success. He did not invent the steamboat, which had been built in the early 1700’s, but rather applied his engineering skills to their design. He changed the proportions, arrangements, and velocities of already proposed ideas. In 1807, work was completed on the Clermont, the first steamboat that was truly successful, and the culmination of many years of work. It’s maiden voyage was on 17 Aug from New York City to Albany, a distance of 150 miles completed in 32 hours. A mechanical genius with many talents, he also designed a system of inland waterways, a submarine (Nautilus, 1801), and a steam warship.”

1114 Water LiliesNovember 14, 1840: “Claude Monet (14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) is born. He was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting…. Monet was fond of painting controlled nature: his own gardens in Giverny, with its water lilies, pond, and bridge. He also painted up and down the banks of the Seine, producing paintings such as Break-up of the ice on the Seine.” Perhaps Monet’s most famous series of paintings is his Water Lilies.

Dust Storm in Phoenix, AZ, July 25, 2014

Dust Storm in Phoenix, AZ, July 25, 2014

November 14, 1919: Today in Science History. John Aitken died. (born 18 Sep 1839) “Scottish physicist and meteorologist known for his research work on atmospheric dust, the formation of dew, cyclones and evaporation. He invented the koniscope to detect and study atmospheric dust particles. He determined that condensation of atmospheric water vapor from clouds and fogs begins on the surface of microscopic particles (now known as Aitken nuclei) as a crucial step in the formation of rain and dew. Combustion produces a profusion of such particles. Suffering from ill health, he worked from a laboratory in his Falkirk home.”

May 8, 1961: First Practical Seawater Desalination Plant

Seawater Desalination Plant (Evaporation Method), Freeport, Texas

Seawater Desalination Plant (Evaporation Method), Freeport, Texas

May 8, 1961: Office of Saline Water, U.S. Dept. of the Interior opened first practical seawater conversion plant in U.S. in Freeport, TX; designed to produce about million gallons of water a day at cost of about $1.25 per thousand gallons; the large-scale evaporation method used then replaced by reverse osmosis as scientific advances have produced special polymers suitable for use as filtering membranes.

Commentary:  Looks pretty clunky compared to today’s technology.

Reference: “Business History.” Website http://www.businesshistory.com/index.php, Accessed November 14, 2012.

November 14, 1765: Death of Robert Fulton; 1840: Birth of Claude Monet; 1919: Death of John Aitken

1114 Robert FultonNovember 14, 1765: Today in Science History. Robert Fulton–Born 14 Nov 1765; died 24 Feb 1815 at age 49. “American inventor, engineer, and artist who brought steamboating from the experimental stage to commercial success. He did not invent the steamboat, which had been built in the early 1700’s, but rather applied his engineering skills to their design. He changed the proportions, arrangements, and velocities of already proposed ideas. In 1807, work was completed on the Clermont, the first steamboat that was truly successful, and the culmination of many years of work. It’s maiden voyage was on 17 Aug from New York City to Albany, a distance of 150 miles completed in 32 hours. A mechanical genius with many talents, he also designed a system of inland waterways, a submarine (Nautilus, 1801), and a steam warship.”

1114 Water LiliesNovember 14, 1840: “Claude Monet (14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) is born. He was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting…. Monet was fond of painting controlled nature: his own gardens in Giverny, with its water lilies, pond, and bridge. He also painted up and down the banks of the Seine, producing paintings such as Break-up of the ice on the Seine.” Perhaps Monet’s most famous series of paintings is his Water Lilies.

1114 John AitkenNovember 14, 1919: Today in Science History. John Aitken died. (born 18 Sep 1839) “Scottish physicist and meteorologist known for his research work on atmospheric dust, the formation of dew, cyclones and evaporation. He invented the koniscope to detect and study atmospheric dust particles. He determined that condensation of atmospheric water vapor from clouds and fogs begins on the surface of microscopic particles (now known as Aitken nuclei) as a crucial step in the formation of rain and dew. Combustion produces a profusion of such particles. Suffering from ill health, he worked from a laboratory in his Falkirk home.”

May 8, 1961: First Practical Seawater Desalination Plant

Seawater Desalination Plant (Evaporation Method), Freeport, Texas

Seawater Desalination Plant (Evaporation Method), Freeport, Texas

May 8, 1961: Office of Saline Water, U.S. Dept. of the Interior opened first practical seawater conversion plant in U.S. in Freeport, TX; designed to produce about million gallons of water a day at cost of about $1.25 per thousand gallons; large-scale evaporation method used then replaced by reverse osmosis as scientific advances have produced special polymers suitable for use as filtering membranes.

Commentary:  Looks pretty clunky compared to today’s technology.

Reference: “Business History.” Website http://www.businesshistory.com/index.php, Accessed November 14, 2012.

November 14, 1765: Death of Robert Fulton; 1840: Birth of Claude Monet; 1919: Death of John Aitken

1114 Robert FultonNovember 14, 1765: Today in Science History. Robert Fulton–Born 14 Nov 1765; died 24 Feb 1815 at age 49. “American inventor, engineer, and artist who brought steamboating from the experimental stage to commercial success. He did not invent the steamboat, which had been built in the early 1700’s, but rather applied his engineering skills to their design. He changed the proportions, arrangements, and velocities of already proposed ideas. In 1807, work was completed on the Clermont, the first steamboat that was truly successful, and the culmination of many years of work. It’s maiden voyage was on 17 Aug from New York City to Albany, a distance of 150 miles completed in 32 hours. A mechanical genius with many talents, he also designed a system of inland waterways, a submarine (Nautilus, 1801), and a steam warship.”

1114 Water LiliesNovember 14, 1840: “Claude Monet (14 November 1840 – 5 December 1926) is born. He was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movement’s philosophy of expressing one’s perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein-air landscape painting…. Monet was fond of painting controlled nature: his own gardens in Giverny, with its water lilies, pond, and bridge. He also painted up and down the banks of the Seine, producing paintings such as Break-up of the ice on the Seine.” Perhaps Monet’s most famous series of paintings is his Water Lilies.

November 14, 1919: Today in Science History. John Aitken died. (born 18 Sep 1839) “Scottish physicist and meteorologist known for his research work on atmospheric dust, the formation of dew, cyclones and evaporation. He invented the koniscope to detect and study atmospheric dust particles. He determined that condensation of atmospheric water vapor from clouds and fogs begins on the surface of microscopic particles (now known as Aitken nuclei) as a crucial step in the formation of rain and dew. Combustion produces a profusion of such particles. Suffering from ill health, he worked from a laboratory in his Falkirk home.”