Tag Archives: pump

April 8, 1915: New Pump Station at Saugus, Massachusetts

April 8, 1915:  Municipal Journalarticle. New Pumping Station Near Completion. “Saugus, Mass.-Work on Saugus’ $25,000 standpipe is progressing rapidly and will be completed in a few weeks. The standpipe is situated on the highest elevation in town. The elevation from the floor of the pump house to the base of the standpipe is 200 feet and with the additional 85 feet, which will be the height of the standpipe, will give a pressure of 126 to 130 pounds, which, at the present time averages 40 pounds pressure in Saugus Centre and East Saugus. The contractors are the Chicago Bridge & Iron Works Co., of Chicago. The standpipe will be supplied by two 300-gallon centrifugal pumps, manufactured by the De Laval Pump Company. These pumps will be driven by two 20-horsepower Westinghouse motors, automatically arranged to keep the height of water in the standpipe at a stated level, without the employment of an attendant. The standpipe is to be used for fire protection principally, for which purpose there has been installed a 6-inch remote control, electrically operated valve, to be operated from the central fire station, which, in case of fire, by the pressing of a button will force the standpipe pressure into the mains.”

Reference:  “New Pumping Station Near Completion.” 1915. Municipal Journal. 38:14(April 8, 1915):478-9.

Commentary:  Pumps powered by electric motors were taking over from the old technology of powering water pumps with steam engines.

Advertisements

December 24, 1896: Large Centrifugal Pump; 1914: Death of John Muir

December 24, 1896:  Engineering Newsarticle–A Large Direct-Driven Centrifugal Pump. “We illustrate herewith a centrifugal sewage pump designed and built for the city of Norfolk, Va., by the Morris Machine Works, Baldwinsville, N. Y. The pump has 20-in. suction and 18-in. discharge, the latter connected to a 20-ln. piping. The actual head worked against Is 26 ft., but when the pump is driven to Its maximum capacity, discharging about 9,000 gallons of water per minute and forcing It through the discharge pipe, which is 1,600 ft. long, the total head pumped against Is equivalent to about 5 ft….

The sewage and drainage from the city flows into a well from which the pump takes its supply, discharging it in the river. The side and sectional views, Fig. 2, show the construction of the pump. The runner is made completely of bronze, so as to withstand the corroding action of sewage and the gases contained therein.”

Commentary: Great pump. Unfortunately, they used it to pump raw sewage into the river, which was a common occurrence in the 1890s. Sewage treatment plants were rare during this period. It would take several decades before sewage treatment was the rule instead of the exception.

Reference: “A Large Direct-Driven Centrifugal Pump.” Engineering News. 36:26(December 24, 1896): 421.

December 24, 1914:  John Muir dies.“John Muir (21 April 1838 – 24 December 1914) was a Scottish-born American naturalist, author, and early advocate of preservation of wilderness in the United States. His letters, essays, and books telling of his adventures in nature, especially in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, have been read by millions. His activism helped to preserve the Yosemite Valley, Sequoia National Park and other wilderness areas. The Sierra Club, which he founded, is now one of the most important conservation organizations in the United States. One of the most well-known hiking trails in the U.S., the 211-mile (340 km) John Muir Trail, was named in his honor. Other places named in his honor are Muir Woods National Monument, Muir Beach, John Muir College, Mount Muir, Camp Muir and Muir Glacier.

In his later life, Muir devoted most of his time to the preservation of the Western forests. He petitioned the U.S. Congress for the National Park bill that was passed in 1890, establishing both Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks. Because of the spiritual quality and enthusiasm toward nature expressed in his writings, he was able to inspire readers, including presidents and congressmen, to take action to help preserve large nature areas. He is today referred to as the “Father of the National Parks,” and the National Park Service produced a short documentary on his life.”

Commentary:  Dam construction to create the Hetch Hetchy water supply for San Francisco in Yosemite National Park was approved by Congress in early December of 1913.  This was a major defeat for Muir and some say that it affected his health so much that he died of a broken heart.

July 24, 1998: Enron Aquires Wessex Water; 1844: Steam Engine Patent; 1855: Water Meter Patent

July 24, 1998Enron Corporation, electricity and gas company in Houston, TX, signed dealto acquire British-based Wessex Water, PLC for $2.2 billion–which was reportedly paid in cash; signaled Enron’s first move towards creating a global water subsidiary—Azurix.

Commentary:  The global water business of Azurix crashed and burned just like the parent company. I had some connections with the folks planning the future of their water holdings and it was clear from the beginning that they had little clue about what they were doing. Near the end, I attended a reception hosted by Azurix at the AWWA annual conference in Denver. After a conversation with an attorney for the company over drinks, it was clear to me that the days of the company were numbered.

Henry Rossiter Worthington

July 24, 1844:  “Henry Rossiter Worthingtonreceived a patent for a “Steam-Boiler Water-Feeder” (new and useful improvements in the manner of constructing and governing auxiliary steam-engines for the purpose of supplying steam-boilers with water”); independent single direct-acting steam power pump, laid the foundation of the entire pump industry.

July 24, 1855– A patent issued for a “Water Metre” (a new and useful Meter for Measuring the Quantity of Flowing Liquids”); one of the first practical water meters in the United States.24

April 8, 1915: New Pump Station at Saugus, Massachusetts

April 8, 1915: Municipal Journal article. New Pumping Station Near Completion. “Saugus, Mass.-Work on Saugus’ $25,000 standpipe is progressing rapidly and will be completed in a few weeks. The standpipe is situated on the highest elevation in town. The elevation from the floor of the pump house to the base of the standpipe is 200 feet and with the additional 85 feet, which will be the height of the standpipe, will give a pressure of 126 to 130 pounds, which, at the present time averages 40 pounds pressure in Saugus Centre and East Saugus. The contractors are the Chicago Bridge & Iron Works Co., of Chicago. The standpipe will be supplied by two 300-gallon centrifugal pumps, manufactured by the De Laval Pump Company. These pumps will be driven by two 20-horsepower Westinghouse motors, automatically arranged to keep the height of water in the standpipe at a stated level, without the employment of an attendant. The standpipe is to be used for fire protection principally, for which purpose there has been installed a 6-inch remote control, electrically operated valve, to be operated from the central fire station, which, in case of fire, by the pressing of a button will force the standpipe pressure into the mains.”

Reference: “New Pumping Station Near Completion.” 1915. Municipal Journal. 38:14(April 8, 1915):478-9.

Commentary: Pumps powered by electric motors were taking over from the old technology of powering water pumps with steam engines.

December 24, 1896: Large Centrifugal Pump; 1914: Death of John Muir

December 24, 1896:  Engineering News article–A Large Direct-Driven Centrifugal Pump. “We illustrate herewith a centrifugal sewage pump designed and built for the city of Norfolk, Va., by the Morris Machine Works, Baldwinsville, N. Y. The pump has 20-in. suction and 18-in. discharge, the latter connected to a 20-ln. piping. The actual head worked against Is 26 ft., but when the pump is driven to Its maximum capacity, discharging about 9,000 gallons of water per minute and forcing It through the discharge pipe, which is 1,600 ft. long, the total head pumped against Is equivalent to about 5 ft….

The sewage and drainage from the city flows into a well from which the pump takes its supply, discharging it in the river. The side and sectional views, Fig. 2, show the construction of the pump. The runner is made completely of bronze, so as to withstand the corroding action of sewage and the gases contained therein.”

Commentary:  Great pump. Unfortunately, the used it to pump raw sewage into the river, which was a common occurrence in the 1890s. Sewage treatment plants were rare during this period. It would take several decades before sewage treatment was the rule instead of the exception.

Reference:  “A Large Direct-Driven Centrifugal Pump.” Engineering News. 36:26(December 24, 1896): 421.

December 24, 1914:  John Muir dies. “John Muir (21 April 1838 – 24 December 1914) was a Scottish-born American naturalist, author, and early advocate of preservation of wilderness in the United States. His letters, essays, and books telling of his adventures in nature, especially in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, have been read by millions. His activism helped to preserve the Yosemite Valley, Sequoia National Park and other wilderness areas. The Sierra Club, which he founded, is now one of the most important conservation organizations in the United States. One of the most well-known hiking trails in the U.S., the 211-mile (340 km) John Muir Trail, was named in his honor. Other places named in his honor are Muir Woods National Monument, Muir Beach, John Muir College, Mount Muir, Camp Muir and Muir Glacier.

In his later life, Muir devoted most of his time to the preservation of the Western forests. He petitioned the U.S. Congress for the National Park bill that was passed in 1890, establishing both Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks. Because of the spiritual quality and enthusiasm toward nature expressed in his writings, he was able to inspire readers, including presidents and congressmen, to take action to help preserve large nature areas. He is today referred to as the “Father of the National Parks,” and the National Park Service produced a short documentary on his life.”

Commentary:  Dam construction to create the Hetch Hetchy water supply for San Francisco in Yosemite National Park was approved by Congress in early December of 1913.  This was a major defeat for Muir and some say that it affected his health so much that he died of a broken heart.

July 24, 1998: Enron Aquires Wessex; 1844: Steam Engine Patent; 1855: Water Meter Patent

July 24, 1998Enron Corporation, electricity and gas company in Houston, TX, signed deal to acquire British-based Wessex Water, PLC for $2.2 billion–which was reportedly paid in cash; signaled Enron’s first move towards creating a global water subsidiary—Azurix.

Commentary: The global water business of Azurix crashed and burned just like the parent company. I had some connections with the folks planning the future of their water holdings and it was clear from the beginning that they had little clue about what they were doing. Near the end, I attended a reception hosted by Azurix at the AWWA annual conference in Denver. After a conversation with an attorney for the company over drinks, it was clear to me that the days of the company were numbered.

Henry Rossiter Worthington

July 24, 1844: “Henry Rossiter Worthington received a patent for a “Steam-Boiler Water-Feeder” (new and useful improvements in the manner of constructing and governing auxiliary steam-engines for the purpose of supplying steam-boilers with water”); independent single direct-acting steam power pump, laid the foundation of the entire pump industry.

July 24, 1855 – A patent issued for a “Water Metre” (a new and useful Meter for Measuring the Quantity of Flowing Liquids”); one of the first practical water meters in the United States.

April 8, 1915: New Pump Station at Saugus, Massachusetts

April 8, 1915: Municipal Journal article. New Pumping Station Near Completion. “Saugus, Mass.-Work on Saugus’ $25,000 standpipe is progressing rapidly and will be completed in a few weeks. The standpipe is situated on the highest elevation in town. The elevation from the floor of the pump house to the base of the standpipe is 200 feet and with the additional 85 feet, which will be the height of the standpipe, will give a pressure of 126 to 130 pounds, which, at the present time averages 40 pounds pressure in Saugus Centre and East Saugus. The contractors are the Chicago Bridge & Iron Works Co., of Chicago. The standpipe will be supplied by two 300-gallon centrifugal pumps, manufactured by the De Laval Pump Company. These pumps will be driven by two 20-horsepower Westinghouse motors, automatically arranged to keep the height of water in the standpipe at a stated level, without the employment of an attendant. The standpipe is to be used for fire protection principally, for which purpose there has been installed a 6-inch remote control, electrically operated valve, to be operated from the central fire station, which, in case of fire, by the pressing of a button will force the standpipe pressure into the mains.”

Reference: “New Pumping Station Near Completion.” 1915. Municipal Journal. 38:14(April 8, 1915):478-9.

Commentary: Pumps powered by electric motors were taking over from the old technology of powering water pumps with steam engines.