Tag Archives: subsidence

October 6, 1906: Houston Buys Water Works

Ground Subsidence in Houston Area

October 6, 1906The City of Houston bought the private Water Works Company for $901,700—the amount of debt owed by the company. With the sale, the City acquired the Water Works plant, 55 wells and 65 miles of mains. The newly organized Water Department rapidly drilled sixty-six new artesian wells to augment the recently acquired infrastructure.

Commentary:  Go to This Day in Water History for September 25, 1982 to see the consequences of the rapid withdrawal of groundwater under Houston–subsidence!

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September 25, 1982: Houston’s Thirst

Land Subsidence in and Around Houston, TX

September 25, 1982New York Times headline–Houston’s Great Thirst is Sucking City Down Into the Ground. “It started to the east of the city some years ago, when homes and industry began to slide into Galveston Bay. Now the entire city of Houston is sinking into its base of sand and clay, including the glittery new residential, commercial and retail developments that have sprung up like weeds in the prairie to the west of downtown. The cause is water. The vast aquifers beneath the city have been overpumped to feed the breakneck development of the last decade. But the solution will cost money, big money, or compel a slowing of growth, so the issue is potentially as much a political one as a geological one in a town in which unbridled growth is gospel.”

October 6, 1906: Houston Buys Water Works

Ground Subsidence in Houston Area

Ground Subsidence in Houston Area

October 6, 1906The City of Houston bought the private Water Works Company for $901,700—the amount of debt owed by the company. With the sale, the City acquired the Water Works plant, 55 wells and 65 miles of mains. The newly organized Water Department rapidly drilled sixty-six new artesian wells to augment the recently acquired infrastructure.

Commentary:  Go to This Day in Water History for September 25, 1982 to see the consequences of the rapid withdrawal of groundwater under Houston–subsidence!

September 25, 1982: Houston’s Thirst

Land Subsidence in and Around Houston, TX

Land Subsidence in and Around Houston, TX

September 25, 1982New York Times headline–Houston’s Great Thirst is Sucking City Down Into the Ground. “It started to the east of the city some years ago, when homes and industry began to slide into Galveston Bay. Now the entire city of Houston is sinking into its base of sand and clay, including the glittery new residential, commercial and retail developments that have sprung up like weeds in the prairie to the west of downtown. The cause is water. The vast aquifers beneath the city have been overpumped to feed the breakneck development of the last decade. But the solution will cost money, big money, or compel a slowing of growth, so the issue is potentially as much a political one as a geological one in a town in which unbridled growth is gospel.”

October 6, 1906: Houston Buys Water Works

1006 Ground subsidence in Houston TXOctober 6, 1906The City of Houston bought the private Water Works Company for $901,700—the amount of debt owed by the company. With the sale, the City acquired the Water Works plant, 55 wells and 65 miles of mains. The newly organized Water Department rapidly drilled sixty-six new artesian wells to augment the recently acquired infrastructure.

Commentary:  Go to This Day in Water History for September 25, 1982 to see the consequences of the rapid withdrawal of groundwater under Houston–subsidence!

September 25, 1982: Houston’s Thirst

Land Subsidence in and Around Houston, TX

Land Subsidence in and Around Houston, TX

September 25, 1982New York Times headline–Houston’s Great Thirst is Sucking City Down Into the Ground. “It started to the east of the city some years ago, when homes and industry began to slide into Galveston Bay. Now the entire city of Houston is sinking into its base of sand and clay, including the glittery new residential, commercial and retail developments that have sprung up like weeds in the prairie to the west of downtown. The cause is water. The vast aquifers beneath the city have been overpumped to feed the breakneck development of the last decade. But the solution will cost money, big money, or compel a slowing of growth, so the issue is potentially as much a political one as a geological one in a town in which unbridled growth is gospel.”

October 6, 1906: Houston Buys Water Works

1006 Ground subsidence in Houston TXOctober 6, 1906The City of Houston bought the private Water Works Company for $901,700—the amount of debt owed by the company. With the sale, the City acquired the Water Works plant, 55 wells and 65 miles of mains. The newly organized Water Department rapidly drilled sixty-six new artesian wells to augment the recently acquired infrastructure.

Commentary:  Go to This Day in Water History for September 25, 1982 to see the consequences of the rapid withdrawal of groundwater under Houston–subsidence!