Tag Archives: water leaks

April 26, 1911: Water Waste in New Bedford, MA

April 26, 1911:  Municipal Journal and Engineereditorial. Waste in Public Water Consumption. “We have had occasion several times to call attention to the fact that no class of consumers waste more water than schools and other municipal buildings and that consequently meters or other methods of restricting waste are fully as important here as on any other services in the city, in spite of the seeming anomaly of a city’s measuring the water which it delivers to itself.

An illustration of this is furnished by the city of New Bedford, Mass. During the year 1910 there was metered and charged to the schools, engine houses, police stations, city hall, library, almshouse, city stables, cemeteries, parks, wharfs and electric car sprinklers 88,809,000 gallons. In addition, metered water was supplied for drinking fountains, extinguishing fires, flushing sewers, puddling trenches, street operations and water department work which is estimated by the superintendent to have amounted to 200,000,000 gallons. This total of 288,000,000 gallons is about one-tenth of the total consumption of the city.

How much water was being wasted previous to the use of meters is not known; but all departments now watch their meter records and if an abnormal amount is registered they quickly locate and remove the cause, while hitherto they have concerned themselves very little with leaky fixtures. The school department, previous to the installment of meters, had several very large motors operating ventilating machines. One of these was metered and found to use over 27,000,000 gallons a year, and it is fair to presume an equal amount was being used by each of the others. When meters were installed at the end of 1909, these motors were all discontinued and electricity was substituted as a motive power.”

Reference:  “Waste in Public Water Consumption.” 1911. Municipal Journal and Engineereditorial 30:17(April 26, 1911): 579.

Commentary:  Fixing leaks and eliminating unaccounted for water is still a big challenge for water utilities today. Utilities realized in the early 20thcentury that fixing water waste was like finding a new water supply.

Advertisements

August 2, 1911: Water Waste in Washington, DC

August 2, 1911:  Municipal Journalarticle. Water Waste in Washington, DC. “The matter of detecting and closing underground leaks in the distribution system is one that the water department of Washington has been working on systematically and rather extensively since 1906.

At that time the rapid increase in both mean consumption and per capita rates made it quite evident that unless radical measures were taken the city would soon be face to face with at least a partial water famine; the increasing danger had been recognized for years, but shortage of funds and the failure of Congress to authorize the general installation of meters had prevented taking up the work on an effective scale.

The per capita rate, based on the entire population, was 169 in 1896 and 217 in 1906, while the mean daily rates for the two years were 44,500,000 and 67,500,000 respectively. During a short period of unusual cold in the winter of 1904-5 the consumption exceeded the capacity of the conduit supplying the city, and the local reservoirs were drawn down close to the danger line. Before the trouble reached the consumer the weather moderated, and conditions again became normal.

Among several means used to decrease the great waste of water was the systematic search for and repair of such underground leaks as showed no evidence on the surface….

The principal instruments used in the work are the pitometer and the aqua phone; the former, as is well known, being a device by means of which the velocity of flow at any point in a main may be determined readily and without undue expense, and the latter an instrument resembling a telephone receiver, by means of which the sound of water escaping under pressure from a leak, flowing through a service pipe or through a partially opened valve may be detected.

April 26, 1911: Water Waste in New Bedford, MA

April 26, 1911:  Municipal Journal and Engineereditorial. Waste in Public Water Consumption. “We have had occasion several times to call attention to the fact that no class of consumers waste more water than schools and other municipal buildings and that consequently meters or other methods of restricting waste are fully as important here as on any other services in the city, in spite of the seeming anomaly of a city’s measuring the water which it delivers to itself.

An illustration of this is furnished by the city of New Bedford, Mass. During the year 1910 there was metered and charged to the schools, engine houses, police stations, city hall, library, almshouse, city stables, cemeteries, parks, wharfs and electric car sprinklers 88,809,000 gallons. In addition, metered water was supplied for drinking fountains, extinguishing fires, flushing sewers, puddling trenches, street operations and water department work which is estimated by the superintendent to have amounted to 200,000,000 gallons. This total of 288,000,000 gallons is about one-tenth of the total consumption of the city.

How much water was being wasted previous to the use of meters is not known; but all departments now watch their meter records and if an abnormal amount is registered they quickly locate and remove the cause, while hitherto they have concerned themselves very little with leaky fixtures. The school department, previous to the installment of meters, had several very large motors operating ventilating machines. One of these was metered and found to use over 27,000,000 gallons a year, and it is fair to presume an equal amount was being used by each of the others. When meters were installed at the end of 1909, these motors were all discontinued and electricity was substituted as a motive power.”

Reference:  “Waste in Public Water Consumption.” 1911. Municipal Journal and Engineereditorial 30:17(April 26, 1911): 579.

Commentary:  Fixing leaks and eliminating unaccounted for water is still a big challenge for water utilities today. Utilities realized in the early 20thcentury that fixing water waste was like finding a new water supply.

August 2, 1911: Water Waste in Washington, DC

August 2, 1911: Municipal Journal article. Water Waste in Washington, DC. “The matter of detecting and closing underground leaks in the distribution system is one that the water department of Washington has been working on systematically and rather extensively since 1906.

At that time the rapid increase in both mean consumption and per capita rates made it quite evident that unless radical measures were taken the city would soon be face to face with at least a partial water famine; the increasing danger had been recognized for years, but shortage of funds and the failure of Congress to authorize the general installation of meters had prevented taking up the work on an effective scale.

The per capita rate, based on the entire population, was 169 in 1896 and 217 in 1906, while the mean daily rates for the two years were 44,500,000 and 67,500,000 respectively. During a short period of unusual cold in the winter of 1904-5 the consumption exceeded the capacity of the conduit supplying the city, and the local reservoirs were drawn down close to the danger line. Before the trouble reached the consumer the weather moderated, and conditions again became normal.

Among several means used to decrease the great waste of water was the systematic search for and repair of such underground leaks as showed no evidence on the surface….

The principal instruments used in the work are the pitometer and the aqua phone; the former, as is well known, being a device by means of which the velocity of flow at any point in a main may be determined readily and without undue expense, and the latter an instrument resembling a telephone receiver, by means of which the sound of water escaping under pressure from a leak, flowing through a service pipe or through a partially opened valve may be detected.

April 26, 1911: Water Waste

April 26, 1911: Municipal Journal and Engineer editorial. Waste in Public Water Consumption. “We have had occasion several times to call attention to the fact that no class of consumers waste more water than schools and other municipal buildings and that consequently meters or other methods of restricting waste are fully as important here as on any other services in the city, in spite of the seeming anomaly of a city’s measuring the water which it delivers to itself.

An illustration of this is furnished by the city of New Bedford, Mass. During the year 1910 there was metered and charged to the schools, engine houses, police stations, city hall, library, almshouse, city stables, cemeteries, parks, wharfs and electric car sprinklers 88,809,000 gallons. In addition, metered water was supplied for drinking fountains, extinguishing fires, flushing sewers, puddling trenches, street operations and water department work which is estimated by the superintendent to have amounted to 200,000,000 gallons. This total of 288,000,000 gallons is about one-tenth of the total consumption of the city.

How much water was being wasted previous to the use of meters is not known; but all departments now watch their meter records and if an abnormal amount is registered they quickly locate and remove the cause, while hitherto they have concerned themselves very little with leaky fixtures. The school department, previous to the installment of meters, had several very large motors operating ventilating machines. One of these was metered and found to use over 27,000,000 gallons a year, and it is fair to presume an equal amount was being used by each of the others. When meters were installed at the end of 1909, these motors were all discontinued and electricity was substituted as a motive power.”

Reference: “Waste in Public Water Consumption.” 1911. Municipal Journal and Engineer editorial 30:17(April 26, 1911): 579.

Commentary: Fixing leaks and eliminating unaccounted for water is still a big challenge for water utilities today. Utilities realized in the early 20th century that fixing water waste was like finding a new water supply.

August 2, 1911: Water Waste in Washington, DC

0802 Water Waste in Washington DCAugust 2, 1911: Municipal Journal article. Water Waste in Washington, DC. “The matter of detecting and closing underground leaks in the distribution system is one that the water department of Washington has been working on systematically and rather extensively since 1906.

At that time the rapid increase in both mean consumption and per capita rates made it quite evident that unless radical measures were taken the city would soon be face to face with at least a partial water famine; the increasing danger had been recognized for years, but shortage of funds and the failure of Congress to authorize the general installation of meters had prevented taking up the work on an effective scale.

The per capita rate, based on the entire population, was 169 in 1896 and 217 in 1906, while the mean daily rates for the two years were 44,500,000 and 67,500,000 respectively. During a short period of unusual cold in the winter of 1904-5 the consumption exceeded the capacity of the conduit supplying the city, and the local reservoirs were drawn down close to the danger line. Before the trouble reached the consumer the weather moderated, and conditions again became normal.

Among several means used to decrease the great waste of water was the systematic search for and repair of such underground leaks as showed no evidence on the surface….

The principal instruments used in the work are the pitometer and the aqua phone; the former, as is well known, being a device by means of which the velocity of flow at any point in a main may be determined readily and without undue expense, and the latter an instrument resembling a telephone receiver, by means of which the sound of water escaping under pressure from a leak, flowing through a service pipe or through a partially opened valve may be detected.

April 26, 1911: Water Waste

0426 Water WasteApril 26, 1911: Municipal Journal and Engineer editorial. Waste in Public Water Consumption. “We have had occasion several times to call attention to the fact that no class of consumers waste more water than schools and other municipal buildings and that consequently meters or other methods of restricting waste are fully as important here as on any other services in the city, in spite of the seeming anomaly of a city’s measuring the water which it delivers to itself.

An illustration of this is furnished by the city of New Bedford, Mass. During the year 1910 there was metered and charged to the schools, engine houses, police stations, city hall, library, almshouse, city stables, cemeteries, parks, wharfs and electric car sprinklers 88,809,000 gallons. In addition, metered water was supplied for drinking fountains, extinguishing fires, flushing sewers, puddling trenches, street operations and water department work which is estimated by the superintendent to have amounted to 200,000,000 gallons. This total of 288,000,000 gallons is about one-tenth of the total consumption of the city.

How much water was being wasted previous to the use of meters is not known; but all departments now watch their meter records and if an abnormal amount is registered they quickly locate and remove the cause, while hitherto they have concerned themselves very little with leaky fixtures. The school department, previous to the installment of meters, had several very large motors operating ventilating machines. One of these was metered and found to use over 27,000,000 gallons a year, and it is fair to presume an equal amount was being used by each of the others. When meters were installed at the end of 1909, these motors were all discontinued and electricity was substituted as a motive power.”

Reference: “Waste in Public Water Consumption.” 1911. Municipal Journal and Engineer editorial 30:17(April 26, 1911): 579.

Commentary: Fixing leaks and eliminating unaccounted for water is still a big challenge for water utilities today. Utilities realized in the early 20th century that fixing water waste was like finding a new water supply.